Bell pepper salad

We got like 2 kg of wonderful red bell peppers with a vegetable delivery a while ago. Organically grown of course, hopefully loaded with vitamins and fibers. The color or taste indicated that at least! Lately we have started to focus more on getting enough quality fibers in our daily meals to serve all the gut bacterias, I’ll come back to that in another post.

I looked for some inspiration of what to pair with the bell pepper and found out that the combination of dill and red onion would be really nice. It turned out fantastic, find the recipe below and make one yourself!

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Saturday lunch with raw bell pepper salad.

Bell pepper w. dill salad

Ingredients used:

  • Red bell peppers
  • Red onion
  • Artichokes
  • Dill, dried or fresh
  • Salt & pepper
  • White wine vinegar
  • Olive oil
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Ingredients used in bell pepper salad with dill, onion and artichokes.

How to:

Chop all the vegetables in suitable sizes. Add in a bowl and add salt, pepper and dill. Sprinkle some white vinegar on top and cover with olive oil. For best result, let it rest for a couple of hours before eating to let the vinegar soften the onion and blend all the flavors nicely.

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Lovely color of the raw bell pepper salad.

I cheated slightly on the resting part though, but it was delicious anyway! The artichokes gives such a nice earthy flavor to the more sour onion and fresh bell pepper.

For this Saturday lunch a while ago we had the salad together with a spinach and tomato frittata topped with pecorino cheese and some fried mushrooms and saurkraut. A satisfying weekend lunch.

Happy paleo,

Cecilia & Magnus

Aubergine w. capers dressing

Aubergine, or eggplant, is a vegetable that we really enjoy having and I think the meaty texture of it makes it fun to work with. For this dish, I was just inspired by the color green! Leek, capers and fresh parsley together with dijon mustard for some sparkly taste..

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Aubergine pan coming out of the oven.

Find the recipe for the dressing below!

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All the main ingredients for the dish.

The aubergine was simply cut into staves adding chopped leek and squeezed garlic on top and seasoned with salt and pepper. Before going into the oven at about 175°C some melted lard was poured over.

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Aubergine pan covered with leek and garlic before going into the oven.

Capers and parsley dressing

Ingredients used:

  • Capers
  • Dijon mustard
  • Fresh parsley
  • Salt & pepper
  • Olive oil

How to:

Chop the parsley and add the rest of the ingredients to taste.

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Capers and fresh parsley dressing with dijon mustard.

The dressing complemented the soft aubergine very good and was making the dish very interesting. A piece of pork loin and avocado was served with it, but I would say almost any protein would work very well to it.

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Dinner with aubergine and dressing on top.

Happy cooking,

Cecilia & Magnus

Beef cheek stew in Wonderbag

Here follows another amazing recipe of a stew made in the Wonderbag! This time our favorite meat, the oxtail, had to stand back for some beef cheeks. Not bad competition!

That is something we haven’t cooked for several years since we have had trouble to find it. But now we were able to get some really nice cheeks from grass-fed cows, which were even better than we remembered them to be. So tender and loaded with fat.

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Beef cheek stew with steamed savoy kale and carrot.

Beef cheek stew w. celery

Ingredients used:

  • Beef cheeks
  • Red onion
  • Celery sticks
  • Root celery
  • Carrot
  • Bay leaves
  • Green pepper
  • Chili powder
  • Salt
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Bone broth + water
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Ingredients used in beef cheek stew.

How to:

  1. Brown the beef cheeks on both sides in a hot saucepan with some cooking fat. Put the cheeks aside.
  2. Chop all the vegetables in small pieces and add to the pot.
  3. Place the cheeks back and add bone broth + water until all is covered.
  4. Add the seasoning and a splash of apple cider vinegar for some acidity.
  5. Let it boil for about 30 minutes on the stove and than place it in the Wonderbag. Seal tightly and leave for a couple of hours. (Or leave at the stove until the meat is really tender.)
  6. When ready, slice the meat and serve with the yummy broth.
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Beef cheeks cooked for several hours.

The taste of the celery was a really nice complement to the meat and the bay leaves gives such a nice depth of all the flavors.

We had the stew with some steamed carrots and savoy kale and topped with soured cucumber and some greens. Turned out as a great dinner, with a glass of red wine to as well.

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Beef cheek stew served with red wine.

Happy beef cheek cooking,

Cecilia & Magnus

Persian chicken stew

Below follows a delicious recipe for a Persian inspired chicken stew. We had it with some “carrot rice” and a really nice green kale salad consisting of kale, lemon, lemon juice and finely chopped red onion. A good, sourish complement to the warm chicken stew.

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Slowcooked chicken stew for dinner with green kale salad.

A chicken stew with roasted nuts in and crunchy fresh pomegranate seeds on top. I was fortunate enough to have cinnamon roasted nuts waiting in the fridge, so I just used them instead of roasting new ones for the stew!

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Ingredients used in the Persian inspired chicken stew.

Chicken stew w. nuts

Ingredients used:

  • Chicken on the bone, 1-2 kg
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 2 dl nuts, roasted and chopped
  • Nutmeg
  • Cinnamon
  • Turmeric
  • Salt & pepper
  • Bone broth + water
  • Pomegranate seeds

How to:

    1. Dry roast the nuts in a frying pan or in the oven.
    2. Heat a pot with butter, lard or coconut oil and gently brown the chicken.
    3. Put the chicken aside and sauté the chopped onion until soft.
    4. Put the chicken back in the pot and cover with bone broth + water.
    5. Add all the spices and nuts and let it boil gently for about 30 minutes.
    6. Place the pot in the Wonderbag for a couple of hours, or on the stovetop until the chicken meat fall off the bones.
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A nice chicken stew.

Don’t forget to top the meal with pomegranate seeds!

Happy slowcook,

Cecilia & Magnus

Gold milk

Two weeks ago we stumbled over a wonderful recipe of a really tasty paste of turmeric, something that they call golden milk. It is basically a mixture of a number of spices that one mix in water reduce to a paste. This paste is then dissolved in coconut milk (or coconut cream+water) to create a close to perfect hot cup for the evening. Curcumin in turmeric is really healthy, but unless you are completely into asian foods with curry etc. it is kind of hard to eat any substantial amounts of it. However, this golden milk is a perfect way!

For the paste:

  • 0,5 dl turmeric
  • 2 dl water
  • 2 tsp black pepper (ground), to block the degeneration of the curcumin in the body and maximise the amount we can have use of.

Blend the ingredients in a sauce pan and bring to a boil, whilst stirring. Let boil until it has turned into a nice paste-like texture.

Add spices for flavour. We have yet to try something outside the basic recipe, because it is just that good(!).

  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp cardamom
  • 1 tsp vanilla powder
  • 4 tbls coconut oil (which helps with the absorption of the curcumin)

Place in a glass jar and store in the fridge for up to two weeks.

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The ingredients for the golden milk paste.

To make the golden milk itself just mix

  • 2 tsp golden milk paste
  • 2 dl coconut milk (or 1 dl coconut cream + 1 dl water)

in a sauce pan, bring to a boil and enjoy!

We can’t get enough of it! About at three each afternoon both of us start to have cravings for our evening cup of golden milk, so there is definitely something good with it! Goes perfect with a bowl of dessicated coconut that you dry roast in a pan and mix with virgin coconut oil as well.

Hope you enjoy it as much as we have! It should also seriously help the immune system cope with all the winter and spring flues/sicknesses that seem to be everywhere.

/Cecilia & Magnus

North African lamb stew

Another lamb stew packed with spices and flavour! Can’t get enough of it and it is so convenient to just let it slowcook in the Wonderbag. To add some extra color and nutrients to the tomato-red stock and the orange root vegetable mash we had steamed red cabbage served with it.

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North African lamb stew for dinner!

We found some really nice pieces of lamb neck and lamb leg at the butcher, perfect meat for this stew.

Spicy lamb stew

Ingredients used:

  • Lamb meat on the bone, 1-2 kg
  • 400 g crushed tomatoes
  • Brown onion
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Bone broth + water
  • Coriander seeds
  • Cumin seeds
  • Ground sweet paprika
  • Ground turmeric
  • Cloves
  • Cardamom seeds
  • Cinnamon
  • Salt & pepper
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Ingredients that will melt together in the Wonderbag.

How to:

1. First, dry-roast the coriander and cumin seeds in a pan.

2. Mortar together with the turmeric, paprika, salt and pepper.

3. Toss the lamb meat in the spices.

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Mortar the yummy spices.
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Cover the lamb meat in the spices before frying.

4. Heat a pot with lard, coconut oil or butter and brown the meat.

5. Place the meat aside, chop the onion and brown it until soft in the pan. When soft, add chopped garlic and grated ginger.

6. Place the meat back in the pan and add the crushed tomato, bone broth and water to cover all the pieces.

7. Add the cloves, cardamom and cinnamon.

8. Let the stew boil softly for at least 30 minutes and place in the Wonderbag for a minimum of 4 hours.

The stew is of course possible to leave on the stove top to finish as well, but a slowcooker is better!

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Lamb stew served with a glass of red wine.

All the spices creates a well needed cosiness and warmth during these cold winter months. To balance the dish, it’s nice to squeeze some lemon juice on top before eating!

Happy slowcook,

Cecilia & Magnus

Minute steak on beetroot bed w. capers and feta cheese

Minute steak along with other “fine” cuts are, as I am sure you all have seen by now, quite rare in our kitchen. However, when we can find it on short expiration date for half price we just might buy it. This time it was a package of minute steak that we picked up.

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Minute steak on a bed of mixed beets with capers and feta cheese.

The nice thing about minute steak, as the name suggests, is that it is quick to cook. Given our inexperience with cooking something for less than 25 minutes this dinner took its share of time to cook despite the minute steaks…

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A nice mix of red and polka beets.

To go with the minute steak we made oven roasted beets of mixed colours, namely red and polka. After cubing them we placed them in a large ramekin, seasoned and topped with neutral coconut oil. The beets were then placed in the oven for roasting at 210 °C for 40 minutes.

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Readying the beets for the oven roasting.

We were also lucky to have some leftover capers from one of our boeuf tartares which we combined with the oven roasted beets together with some crumbles of feta cheese. To top it all off we added a small amount of sauerkraut.

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The final dinner of minute steak, beets, capers and feta cheese.

Excluding the planning time to get the beets roasted and done the whole dish did not actually need that much preparation. Once the beets are in the oven one can pretty much do whatever one wants to for about 30 minutes before it is time to get back to the kitchen and finish the minute steaks, laying the table and planning the plating. So, in that regard it is quite nice to cook minute steak for a change. It was tasty for sure, but it is a long way from being comparable with slow cooked meats with marbled strains of fat. Like ox-tail or loin of pork. Anyhow, hope you enjoyed the inspiration for the side and happy paleo cooking.

Love,

Cecilia & Magnus