Curry chicken w. leek and cabbage wedges

This dinner we made whole chicken in the Schlemmertopf.

 

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Chicken with leek cooked in the Schlemmertopf.

 

 

We started off with a nice mix of spices:

  • turmeric
  • curry
  • ginger
  • cayenne peppper
  • cumin
  • black pepper and
  • fennel.

Together with that we cut a leek into three pieces and chopped a red chili, which we spread out on top of the chicken.

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Chicken with a nice assortment of spices.

 

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The red chili pepper, which we got in our delivery from Årstiderna.

I have found that it makes for a better dish seasoning wise to decide on the amount of spices before one puts them in the pan or stew, etc. Putting them straight into the food I tend to be a bit restrictive, whereas if I place them on a plate or in the mortar and then pour them into the food I tend to be closer to the sweet spot. The past few times I have done this way I have ended up with close to perfect amount of the spices I selected. There is still a long way to go for me to get the whole composition between the tastes right, but in terms of using the spices to bring out the flavours of the food this seems to be working for me at least.

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The spices going into the Schlemmertopf together with the chicken.

 

After pre-soaking the Schlemmertopf, mortaring the spices in need of that and chopping the chili it all was placed in the pot and put into the oven at 140 °C.

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The final chicken.

As sides we made white cabbage wedges that we roasted in the oven after taking out the chicken, that we left to rest in the Schlemmertopf.

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The dinner plate, chicken leg, leek, white cabbage wedges and fresh grated carrots and beets.

Finally we served the chicken and the cabbage wedges with a few leaves of lettuce and some freshly grated carrots and red beets.

Happy paleo,

Cecilia & Magnus

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Oven roasted cabbage and fennel

Of all vegetables cabbage must be the easiest one to cook and there are so many different ways of cooking it as well. Steaming, roasting, frying, etc. and all produce really wonderful flavours. It was time again for some oven roasted cabbage and fennel.

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Leftover chuck steak, fried egg, rucola and oven roasted cabbage and fennel.

Keeping it simple we chopped the cabbage and fennel and seasoned them with black pepper and some fresh basil. Then placed it in the oven at 160 °C.

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Cabbage and fennel seasoned with black pepper and fresh basil.

We roasted it in the oven for about 30 minutes. Since we had some leftover chuck steak from the other day we simply heated some of that and fried an egg.

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The ready fennel and cabbage.

Served with some rucola, olive oil, coconut vinegar and a click of butter and we had a tasty and extremely simple dinner, which we enjoyed with a glass of cold kombucha.

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Enjoying the simple dinner together with a glass of kombucha.

Happy dinner,

Cecilia & Magnus

 

Oven roasted purple kohlrabi

Last week we picked up a purple kohlrabi from FRAM. It really is wonderful to use vegetables with all different colours. Not only are they beautiful but they are also healthy with a lot of phytochemicals that help taking care of your body.

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Purple kohlrabi, carrots and fennel.

As you have probably realised by now, we do like oven roasted vegetables, so that was what we decided to do with the kohlrabi as well. Together with the kohlrabi we chopped some carrots and a fennel. It turned out to be a really nice combination. Seasoned with some white and black pepper and salt.

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The vegetables ready to go into the oven.

After roasting in the oven at 180 °C for about an hour they were ready to be served.

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Ready to be served.

Keep exploring the wonders of food!

Cecilia & Magnus

Pork belly with fried mushrooms

Time for pork belly again! This time seasoned with coriander, pepper and ginger.

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The pork belly straight out of the oven.

After massaging the spices into the cuts in the pork belly it was put in the oven for six hours on about 160-170 °C.

Sides

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Fennel and pointed cabbage ready to be steamed.

As sides I steamed some fennel and pointed cabbage. And fried some onion and mushrooms in a lot of butter.

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Preparing the onion and mushrooms for frying.
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Frying the mushrooms and onion in the cast iron pan with a lot of butter.

The result

It all resulted in a quite nice and tasty dinner.

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The final dish. Served with some salad.

Have a nice dinner,

Cecilia & Magnus

Inspired lunchbox vegetables

Some days one just get that surge of creativity and energy to do things. The other day I got that when I started cooking lunch way too late in the day. Halfway through the cooking I realised that I would never get to eat lunch if I were to wait out the vegetables that I had put in the oven, so they ended up in some lunch boxes instead. However, I was quite happy with the combination of vegetables, so I thought it would be worth sharing anyways.

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The colourful mix of vegetables.

I copped and mixed fennel, sweet potato, onion, carrots and some fresh garlic cloves. Seasoned with salt and pepper as well as with two branches of fresh rosemary from our newly planted plant.

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The vegetables used, sweet potato, fennel, carrots, onion and some fresh garlic cloves.

The vegetables then went into the oven at about 190 °C for almost a full hour. It was maybe slightly to high temperature for the delicate and small pieces that I had made, as can be seen from the slightly dark edges below… Since I ended up cooking something simple for lunch while the vegetables were in the oven I guess they also ended up being left in there for a few minutes too long as well.

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The ready oven roasted vegetables.

They tasted great though, so nothing to worry about in the end and the made two perfect lunch boxes when mixed with some leftover pork chops and a few slices of butter.

Have you had any creative surges lately? Or misplanned your cooking?

Enjoy paleo foods,

Cecilia & Magnus

Spare ribs with steamed fennel

One of the things that we miss with living in an apartment is a grill. During winter time it is not a huge deal, but when the sun stays up in the evenings and it is getting hotter having the possibility of doing a BBQ would have been really nice. Not to mention the different flavours that one is able to get with a grill compared to an oven!

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Spare ribs seasoned with an assortment of pepper, rosé, green, black and white.

Well, we don’t have a grill, but that doesn’t mean we can’t have spare ribs. We prepare them in the oven on a semi-high temperature for at least a few hours. This time we used an assortment of peppers, including black, white, rosé and green, together with salt to season before the spare ribs were put into the oven at about 200 °C.

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The spare ribs ready for the oven.

To spend the time waiting for the spare ribs to be finished we went on a combined walk and workout in the evening sun. Perfect prelude to a dinner with ribs, right?

Getting back from the walk we cut and steamed some fennel and prepared some salad as sides.

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The spare ribs are served.

After spending about two hours in the oven the ribs were ready to be served and they were delicious.

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Spare ribs with steamed fennel and a feta cheese salad.

Together with the steamed fennel and the feta cheese salad it was a really nice summer evening meal. Crisp and light, yet full of healthy energy and nutrients. Having the home-brewed kombucha to drink together with the meal was also a perfect way of quenshing our thirst.

Enjoy paleo life,

Cecilia & Magnus

Pork belly with cacao and chili

Pork belly, one of our favourites

I know it starts to get difficult to keep track of our favourite meats now, but pork belly definitely comes in at the top. It doesn’t trump ox tail, but it is not too far behind. Anyways, this time I ventured to try something different. During our year in Dublin we ate a lot of pork belly and found some really nice recipes and this is an iteration of one of those.

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For seasoning cacao, cayenne pepper, chili and fennel.

A really nice combination is chili and cacao. It also goes really well with the fat of the pork belly. To really get a nice flavour use a lot (!) of seasoning. The fat can accommodate a lot of the seasoning and a good way of getting adequate exposure to the spices is to rub them into the meat. Make sure that your butcher helps you to slit the rind.

Fennel, cabbage and pork belly in the Schlemmertopf

Starting off I chopped up the fennel and wedged the cabbage and put in the bottom of the Schlemmertopf together with some water. Put the pork belly on top of the vegetables and add the chili, cacao and cayenne pepper. I used two table spoons of cacao and a pinch each of the cayenne and chili powder. However, with the result in mind I would suggest you use more spices and rub them into the pork belly really thoroughly. When serving the meat one will only get a really small slice of the crust and to compensate for that it is nice to have a lot of spices there. I will definitely use more spices next time around.

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The pork belly in the Schlemmertopf ready for the oven.

After the seasoning is done put the whole thing in the oven for as long as you can wait… No, but at least for a couple of hours. Depending on the time you have available you might want to tune the temperature accordingly. I used 160 °C for the first two hours and then turned it up to 210 °C for the concluding 30 minutes.

Before the last 30 minutes I removed the Schlemmertopf from the oven and added some feta cheese on the top. For this last part of the cooking I left the lid off, to allow the feta cheese to get a nice colour.

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The feta cheese topped pork belly straight out of the oven.

After waiting for the pork belly to finish I sliced it in thin slices and served with some fresh home grown salad from our balcony together with a glass of kombucha.

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The dinner. Finally after the long worthwhile wait.

Hope you found some inspiration from this outline of a recipe. Do you have any favourite seasoning for when you cook pork belly?

Happy paleo,

/Cecilia & Magnus