Bell pepper salad

We got like 2 kg of wonderful red bell peppers with a vegetable delivery a while ago. Organically grown of course, hopefully loaded with vitamins and fibers. The color or taste indicated that at least! Lately we have started to focus more on getting enough quality fibers in our daily meals to serve all the gut bacterias, I’ll come back to that in another post.

I looked for some inspiration of what to pair with the bell pepper and found out that the combination of dill and red onion would be really nice. It turned out fantastic, find the recipe below and make one yourself!

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Saturday lunch with raw bell pepper salad.

Bell pepper w. dill salad

Ingredients used:

  • Red bell peppers
  • Red onion
  • Artichokes
  • Dill, dried or fresh
  • Salt & pepper
  • White wine vinegar
  • Olive oil
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Ingredients used in bell pepper salad with dill, onion and artichokes.

How to:

Chop all the vegetables in suitable sizes. Add in a bowl and add salt, pepper and dill. Sprinkle some white vinegar on top and cover with olive oil. For best result, let it rest for a couple of hours before eating to let the vinegar soften the onion and blend all the flavors nicely.

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Lovely color of the raw bell pepper salad.

I cheated slightly on the resting part though, but it was delicious anyway! The artichokes gives such a nice earthy flavor to the more sour onion and fresh bell pepper.

For this Saturday lunch a while ago we had the salad together with a spinach and tomato frittata topped with pecorino cheese and some fried mushrooms and saurkraut. A satisfying weekend lunch.

Happy paleo,

Cecilia & Magnus

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Friday boeuf tartare

The past few Fridays we have had boeuf tartare mainly for its simplicity, but also because it is just such a wonderful dish! This time we had it with fermented cucumber, cabbage and the rest of the elderflower capers that we also had last time we ate boeuf tartare.

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Boeuf tartare with fermented vegetables and roasted brussel sprouts.

The real advantage with having something that doesn’t require cooking is that after a long work week one can simply put it on the table and enjoy. That said, we have had the habit of cooking something warm as a side, which somewhat defeats that purpose, but it is a huge difference only waiting for some brussel sprouts to finish in the oven compared to making meat patties or roasting a steak as well.

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The sides, femented cucumber, dijon mustard, elderflower capers and chopped red onion.

After having tried both red and brown onion with the tartare we have decided that the red ones matches slightly better, so that is what we will go with most of the time in the future as well.

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Some green leaves and a salad dressing of olive oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic was a nice addition as well.

In addition to chopped red onion we had some fermented cucumber, dijon mustard, elderflower capers and a green salad with a garlic, balsamic vinegar and olive oil dressing.

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Perfect simple Friday night dinner.

This time I (Magnus) went by FRAM on the way home from work to buy the minced meat for the tartare and took the opportunity of buying some fresh brussel sprouts as well as some mushrooms, which were all oven roasted and served with the tartare.

At the moment we will probably keep up with the trend of having boeuf tartare on Fridays, at least until we have gotten bored with it. But, if people can have Tacos every Friday, why can’t we stick with boeuf tartare?

Happy paleo weekend!

Cecilia & Magnus

Butternut soup

The grocery stores are packed with root vegetables and it’s starting to get cooler outside. Time for a warm, creamy soup! Bacon, wild boar sausage and feta cheese made a really nice topping to it.

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Butternut squash soup topped with bacon, sausage and feta cheese.

This one is based on butternut squash with some root celery  and red onions added. The butternut squash makes everything rich and smooth.

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The vegetables and seasoning used in the soup.

Butternut squash soup

Ingredients needed:

  • Butternut squash
  • Root celery
  • Red onions
  • Garlic
  • Fresh turmeric
  • Nutmeg
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Green pepper
  • Lemon juice
  • Coconut cream
  • Coconut oil
  • Bone broth
  • Bacon
  • Sausage

 

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The rest of the ingredients used for the butternut squash soup.

 

How to:

  1. Chop and brown the onion in a large pot using coconut oil.
  2. Chop the root vegetables and let them brown slightly in the pot as well.
  3. Add the coconut cream, bone broth and water until all the veggies are covered.
  4. Add the seasoning.
  5. Let everything boil until the veggies are soft. Meanwhile, fry the bacon and sausage in a frying pan.
  6. When the veggies are soft, use a mixer and mix it to your desired texture.
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Enjoyable dinner!

We topped everything with some feta cheese and olive oil as well! Very tasty!

Happy cooking,

Cecilia & Magnus

Roquefort burgers in cabbage wraps

After doing our dessert of melon and Roquefort we had more than half the package of cheese left and some really tasty minced meat in the fridge, so we thought we would make hamburgers.

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Beef hamburgers with Roquefort in the cast iron pan.

Since starting with Paleo we have had hamburgers only a few times and then in lettuce leaves. Last week at FRAM we picked up some special type of white cabbage, slightly flatter and perfect for making wraps, so rather than using lettuce this time we used that instead. They are actually really tasty, crisp and adds some extra flavour, compared to lettuce…

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The vegetables for the hamburger and the Roquefort of course.

Together with the Roquefort we choose to use tomatoes, red onion and cucumber to combine with the hamburger.

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The sliced veggies.

The next step was making the burgers. We prefer using the meat alone when making patties, meat balls or burgers. Primarily because they stick together really well whereas when you start mixing it up with other stuff that might not be the case. Secondly, it is just so easy to pick up the minced meat and form the burgers. And thirdly, it allows you to taste the meat itself rather than something else.

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Everything is ready, just need to fry the burgers.

We used our cast iron pan for frying the burgers on low temperature and finished by adding the Roquefort on the top.

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Frying the burgers in the cast iron pan. Topping with the Roquefort.

Then placing all ingredients in the cabbage leaves and voila! a burger! Look at those amazing cabbage leaves, aren’t they just perfect?

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The final burgers

We were really happy with the results! Burgers with blue cheese is just a marvelous combination! And using grass-fed organic meat you can really enjoy the taste from the meat itself as well. No need for any artificial sauces.

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The four dinner burgers ready to be eaten.

As a side we steamed some carrots as well. Not the most inspired side maybe, but tasty none the less. A great combination would have been making oven roasted turnip sticks or sweet potato. However, we were unable to find any at FRAM this week.

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Served with some steamed carrots.

Served with a glass of cold home brewed kombucha and we were all set for a nice dinner.

How do you make your burgers? What are your favourite stuffing?

/Cecilia & Magnus